HomeEvents / From Puzuk to Sakatek: Ivan...

From Puzuk to Sakatek: Ivan M. Havel 1938–1989

Illustration
  • Where: Václav Havel Library, Ostrovní 13, Prague 110 00
  • When: October 19, 2017, 19:00 – 21:00

Jana Wohlmuth Markupová’s publication Od Puzuka k Sakatekovi. Ivan M. Havel 1938–1989 (From Puzuk to Sakatek: Ivan M. Havel 1938–1989) introduces readers to the life of an important continuator of the Havel family, a scientist, intellectual and writer who has been active in a number of different, at first sight incompatible worlds, on the boundary between the official and unofficial spheres, a person who brings together science and art. This effort to understand the personality of Ivan M. Havel is accompanied by an awareness of his broader, in particular family, context, reaching back to the early 20th century.

The discussion with Ivan M. Havel and the publication’s author Jana Wohlmuth Markupová’s will be helmed by Miroslav Vaněk, director of the Institute for Contemporary History.

The Václav Havel Library in cooperation with the Karolinum publishing house.

Share

Facebook | Twitter

Letters to Olga – essays written in prison, letter

„Once you’re here, however, whether you want to or not, you have to ask the question: does all of this have a meaning, and if so, what?… Ultimately, I can only find an answer – a positive answer – within myself, in my general faith in the meaning of things, in my hope. What, in fact, is man responsible to? What does he relate to? What is the final horizon of his actions, the absolute vanishing point of everything he does, the undeceivable “memory of Being”, the conscience of the world and the final “court of appeal”? What is the decisive standard of measurement, the background or the field of each of his existential experiences? And likewise, what is the most important witness or the secret sharer in his daily conversations with himself, the thing that – regardless of what situation he has been thrown into – he incessantly inquires after, depends upon, and toward which his actions are directed, the thing that, in its omniscience and incorruptibility, both haunts and saves him, the only thing he can trust in and strive for? “

Václav Havel:
Letters to Olga – essays written in prison, letter, August 7, 1980

What Price Human Rights?