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From Puzuk to Sakatek: Ivan M. Havel 1938–1989

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  • Where: Václav Havel Library, Ostrovní 13, Prague 110 00
  • When: October 19, 2017, 19:00 – 21:00

Jana Wohlmuth Markupová’s publication Od Puzuka k Sakatekovi. Ivan M. Havel 1938–1989 (From Puzuk to Sakatek: Ivan M. Havel 1938–1989) introduces readers to the life of an important continuator of the Havel family, a scientist, intellectual and writer who has been active in a number of different, at first sight incompatible worlds, on the boundary between the official and unofficial spheres, a person who brings together science and art. This effort to understand the personality of Ivan M. Havel is accompanied by an awareness of his broader, in particular family, context, reaching back to the early 20th century.

The discussion with Ivan M. Havel and the publication’s author Jana Wohlmuth Markupová’s will be helmed by Miroslav Vaněk, director of the Institute for Contemporary History.

The Václav Havel Library in cooperation with the Karolinum publishing house.

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Speech to Joint Session of the United States Congress, Washington

„We are still a long way from that „family of man;“ in fact, we seem to be receding from the ideal rather than drawing closer to it. Interests of all kinds: personal, selfish, state, national, group and, if you like, company interests still considerably outweigh genuinely common and global interests. We are still under the sway of the destructive and thoroughly vain belief that man is the pinnacle of creation, and not just a part of it, and that therefore everything is permitted. There are still many who say they are concerdend not for themselves but for the cause, while they are demonstrably out for themselves and not for the cause at all. We are still destroying the planet that was entrusted to us, and its environment. We still close our eyes to the growing social, ethnic and cultural conflicts in the world. From time to time we say that the anonymous megamachinery we have created for ourselves no longer serves us but rather has enslaved us, yet we still fail to do anything about it.“

Václav Havel:
Speech to Joint Session of the United States Congress, Washington, February 21, 1990

Václav Havel’s Prague