Dublin

Havel's place Dublin

  • installation date: December 10, 2013
  • address: Park Sv. Patricka, Dublin, Ireland
  • foto: © Bill Shipsey

A Havel’s Place was ceremonially unveiled in St. Patrick’s Park in Dublin on Tuesday 10 December 2013. Lord Mayor Oisín Quinn and the Czech ambassador to Ireland, Tomáš Kafka, participated in the ceremony, which was also attended by Václav Havel Library representatives Marta Smolíková and Jan Macháček.

Havel’s Place is a memorial dedicated to Václav Havel. It comprises two chairs linked by a round table with a tree growing through its centre. The installation of Havel’s Places is a worldwide project initiated by the Czech ambassador to the US, Petr Gandalovič, and the architect and designer Bořek Šípek. The aim of the project, which is coordinated and implemented by the Václav Havel Library, is to create a network of places in public spaces that can contribute to meeting and the holding of genuine dialogue – places where it will be possible to hold discussions and reflect in the spirit of the ideals and philosophy of Václav Havel.

The first ever Havel’s Place was ceremonially unveiled at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. on 3 October 2013 in the presence of Dagmar Havlová. The Irish city of Dublin boasts the first Havel’s Place in Europe, thanks to Bill Shipsey, director of the organisation Art for Amnesty. 

Speech to Joint Session of the United States Congress, Washington

„We are still a long way from that „family of man;“ in fact, we seem to be receding from the ideal rather than drawing closer to it. Interests of all kinds: personal, selfish, state, national, group and, if you like, company interests still considerably outweigh genuinely common and global interests. We are still under the sway of the destructive and thoroughly vain belief that man is the pinnacle of creation, and not just a part of it, and that therefore everything is permitted. There are still many who say they are concerdend not for themselves but for the cause, while they are demonstrably out for themselves and not for the cause at all. We are still destroying the planet that was entrusted to us, and its environment. We still close our eyes to the growing social, ethnic and cultural conflicts in the world. From time to time we say that the anonymous megamachinery we have created for ourselves no longer serves us but rather has enslaved us, yet we still fail to do anything about it.“

Václav Havel:
Speech to Joint Session of the United States Congress, Washington, February 21, 1990

The unbearable lightness of evilVáclav Havel’s Prague